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In a hot housing market, these are America’s hottest zip codes

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A new Realtor.com survey of the nation’s hottest zip codes puts Colorado Springs atop the list for 2021. Residents of 80916 saw a blend of high interest in house listings and fast sales contributing to its No. 1 ranking.

All of the houses in the top 10 markets were located outside big city centers, offering more space and comparably lower prices, but still giving buyers access to amenities and attractions. And with the market as hot as it has been nationwide, buyers are looking to make the most of their money and willing to live farther out to achieve that.

Here’s how this year’s list shakes out.

  1. 80916 East Colorado Springs, Colo. (Colorado Springs) – Average listing price: $318,000
  2. 14617 West Irondequoit, N.Y. (Rochester) – Average listing price: $175,000
  3. 01960 Peabody, Mass. (Boston) – Average listing price: $625,000
  4. 03103 Manchester proper, N.H. (Manchester) – Average listing price: $315,000
  5. 27616 Brentwood, N.C. (Raleigh) – Average listing price: $319,000
  6. 43228 Lincoln Village, Ohio (Columbus) – Average listing price: $235,000
  7. 01757 Milford, Mass. (Worcester) – Average listing price: $455,000
  8. 03301 Concord proper, N.H. (Concord) – Average listing price: $343,000
  9. 48336 Farmington, Mich. (Detroit) – Average listing price: $244,000
  10. 37067 Franklin, Tenn. (Nashville) – Average listing price: $847,000

The rankings take two factors into account—market demand (measured by viewers per property) and the number of days a property is listed as active. None of the median days on market for any of the top 10 cities was more than nine days. One (Peabody, Mass.) averaged three days.

“By definition, the ZIPs that make our annual hottest report are very competitive, but this year, they are white-hot,” said Realtor.com chief economist Danielle Hale. “Homes in this year’s ZIPs are under contract in less than a week, which is three times faster than the contract times for last year’s hottest markets.

“The rise in remote work has given some buyers more flexibility to live wherever they want, and many are finding larger homes at lower prices, as well as a higher quality of life,” Hale added.

Published by Fortune

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